Serving those who have served

At Clearway, we have the unique opportunity to serve those who have served. Each day, we see countless veterans in pain from all branches of service. According to the National Institutes of Health, 66.5% of veterans reported having pain over a three month period (1). Of those, 9.1% reported having severe pain. We believe that no one should have to live with pain. We help patients relieve, restore, and renew to improve their quality of life.

Being located near several military bases, we know that military culture is common amongst our patients. Often, patients may feel judged for seeking care, particularly in pain management. We believe that the best way to make our practice veteran-friendly is by hiring veterans to give you the best possible care. Veterans understand the unique culture of the military and can create a caring and understanding environment for medical care.

This Independence Day, we’d like to honor the service of our Clearway providers: Dr. David DiSanto, Dr. Jason Capra, Dr. R. Ken Garrett, and David Downey, PA. To celebrate their achievements and service, we sat down with Dr. R. Ken Garrett to learn more about how his military background impacts how he treats patients today.

Dr. Garrett pictured in Afghanistan, 2002

Tell us about your time serving in the military.

Dr. Garrett: I started my military career as active duty. My first deployment was to El Salvador in 1984 as a Special Operations Medic in the 7th Special Forces Group. Later, I served in Desert Storm in ’91 and ‘92. I was also deployed to Afghanistan. Throughout my career, I moved up through the ranks to become an Officer and Flight Surgeon. I wouldn’t be the physician that I am today without these experiences.

How has your military experience impacted the way that you treat your patients?

Dr. Garrett: In this area, there’s such a large military population that I usually see at least one veteran a day. I feel a special connection with my military patients, whether they are active duty or retired. Having served myself, I understand military culture, and I know that understanding is an important part of providing my patients with empathetic care.

With any patient, I know that respect and empathy is key. I treat my patients by putting myself in their shoes. I don’t just want to understand their pain- I want to find the root cause of it. Sometimes it can be challenging, but the military taught me a lot about persistence. Once I do find the source of the patient’s pain, I do my best to educate them on what we can do together to reduce pain and increase quality of life. It’s both of us working together to find a solution that works. All these skills are things that I started building while I served. I feel so honored to have a civilian job where I am involved in caring for local veterans.